More poetry in advertising…

A couple of months ago, I blogged about the increasing number of companies using poetry in their advertising campaigns; since then, I’ve spotted more and more examples cropping up (once you see one, you start to see them everywhere!).

My current favourite is the O2 Breathe it all in advert, a beautifully produced piece which features British spoken word artist George the Poet and music by Jamie xx:

Side note: Kudos to O2 for making the poem available to enjoy via augmented reality (AR) too; as part of the campaign they created a Snapchat lens which displays lines from the poem across the sky when users hold their phones up to it.

I also quite like Walt Disney World’s That’s the power of magic advert, which may seem a bit cheesy to adults but was undoubtedly created to appeal to children (anything which encourages children to enjoy poetry is alright by me):

Although I generally prefer adverts that use poetry to convey a broader message, I don’t mind a snappy poem that simply explains the advertiser’s brand promise – such as this one by Red Tractor:

I also quite like Plusnet’s humorous take on one of the nation’s favourite poems, If by Rudyard Kipling, in their recent Can’t help but help advert:

As much as I love poetry and enjoy seeing it presented in different ways, there are a couple of adverts in which I find the use of poetry quite irritating; to be fair, the Persil advert isn’t that bad (it just feels a bit “poetry for poetry’s sake”) but the Nando’s advert makes me want to throw the remote at the TV!

Each to their own, I guess…

What do you think? Have you spotted any other good/bad examples of poetry in advertising? 

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